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Today's Stichomancy for Sidney Poitier

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Lover's Complaint by William Shakespeare:

'For lo! his passion, but an art of craft, Even there resolv'd my reason into tears; There my white stole of chastity I daff'd, Shook off my sober guards, and civil fears; Appear to him, as he to me appears, All melting; though our drops this difference bore: His poison'd me, and mine did him restore.

'In him a plenitude of subtle matter, Applied to cautels, all strange forms receives, Of burning blushes or of weeping water, Or swooning paleness; and he takes and leaves,

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Danny's Own Story by Don Marquis:

be the deuce to pay. But they aren't going to make any more trouble. I know these country crooks. They've got no stomach for trouble out- side their own township."

Which made me feel considerable better, fur I never been of the opinion that going agin the law done any one no good.

They looks around in that wagon, and all their stuff was there--Jake Smith and the squire hav- ing kep' it all together careful to make things seem more legal, I suppose--and the doctor was plumb

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte:

the hearth. This morning, the village school opened. I had twenty scholars. But three of the number can read: none write or cipher. Several knit, and a few sew a little. They speak with the broadest accent of the district. At present, they and I have a difficulty in understanding each other's language. Some of them are unmannered, rough, intractable, as well as ignorant; but others are docile, have a wish to learn, and evince a disposition that pleases me. I must not forget that these coarsely-clad little peasants are of flesh and blood as good as the scions of gentlest genealogy; and that the germs of native excellence, refinement, intelligence, kind feeling, are as likely to exist in their hearts as in those of the best-born.


Jane Eyre