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Today's Stichomancy for Steve Jobs

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Common Sense by Thomas Paine:

in support of Independance, which men should rather privately think of, than be publicly told of. We ought not now to be debating whether we shall be independant or not, but, anxious to accomplish it on a firm, secure, and honorable basis, and uneasy rather that it is not yet began upon. Every day convinces us of its necessity. Even the Tories (if such beings yet remain among us) should, of all men, be the most solicitous to promote it; for, as the appointment of committees at first, protected them from popular rage, so, a wise and well established form of government, will be the only certain means of continuing it securely to them. WHEREFORE, if they have not virtue enough to be WHIGS, they ought to have prudence enough to wish for Independance.


Common Sense
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Herbert West: Reanimator by H. P. Lovecraft:

West was about to relegate the mystery of life to the category of myth. The body now twitched more vigorously, and beneath our avid eyes commenced to heave in a frightful way. The arms stirred disquietingly, the legs drew up, and various muscles contracted in a repulsive kind of writhing. Then the headless thing threw out its arms in a gesture which was unmistakably one of desperation -- an intelligent desperation apparently sufficient to prove every theory of Herbert West. Certainly, the nerves were recalling the manís last act in life; the struggle to get free of the falling aeroplane. What followed, I shall never positively know. It


Herbert West: Reanimator
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Blix by Frank Norris:

through by now--her opinions, her ideas, her convictions? Was there any more freshness in her for him? Was their little flirtation of the last eighteen months, charming as it had been, about to end? Had they played out the play, had they come to the end of each other's resources? He had never considered the possibility of this before, but all at once as he looked at Travis--looked fairly into her little brown-black eyes--it was borne in upon him that she was thinking precisely the same thing. Condy Rivers had met Travis at a dance a year and a half before this, and, because she was so very pretty, so unaffected, and so