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Today's Stichomancy for Steve McQueen

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Duchess of Padua by Oscar Wilde:

GUIDO

The traitor's name?

MORANZONE

Thou wilt hear that anon; The Duke and other nobles at the Court Are coming hither.

GUIDO

What of that? his name?

MORANZONE

Do they not seem a valiant company Of honourable, honest gentlemen?

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson:

the corner of these two, a very dark and cheerless tavern, by way of principal hotel.

I had dressed myself somewhat more suitably to my station in life, and at once called upon the minister in his little manse beside the graveyard. He knew me, although it was more than nine years since we had met; and when I told him that I had been long upon a walking tour, and was behind with the news, readily lent me an armful of newspapers, dating from a month back to the day before. With these I sought the tavern, and, ordering some breakfast, sat down to study the "Huddlestone Failure."

It had been, it appeared, a very flagrant case. Thousands of

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from A Footnote to History by Robert Louis Stevenson:

sharp. Death, deportation by the primitive method of setting the criminal to sea in a canoe, fines, and in Samoa itself the penalty of publicly biting a hot, ill-smelling root, comparable to a rough forfeit in a children's game - these are approved. The offender is killed, or punished and forgiven. We, on the other hand, harbour malice for a period of years: continuous shame attaches to the criminal; even when he is doing his best - even when he is submitting to the worst form of torture, regular work - he is to stand aside from life and from his family in dreadful isolation. These ideas most Polynesians have accepted in appearance, as they accept other ideas of the whites; in practice, they reduce it to a