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Today's Stichomancy for Ulysses S. Grant

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Mucker by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

beside the deputy sheriff and commenced to go through the man's clothes. After a moment he came upon what he sought--a key ring confining several keys.

Billy found the one he wished and presently he was free. He still stood looking at the deputy sheriff.

"I ought to croak you," he murmured. "I'll never make my get-away if I don't; but SHE won't let me--God bless her."

Suddenly a thought came to Billy Byrne. If he could have a start he might escape. It wouldn't hurt the man any to stay here for a few hours, or even for a day. Billy removed the deputy's coat and tore it into strips. With these he bound the


The Mucker
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from In a German Pension by Katherine Mansfield:

Damned elegant the way she manages her sleigh!"

"I'm cold all through. That's the worst of this place--the mists--it's a damp cold. Here, Forman, look after this sleigh--and stick it somewhere so that I can get it without looking through a hundred and fifty others to- morrow morning."

They sat down at a small round table near the stove and ordered coffee. Victor sprawled in his chair, patting his little brown dog Bobo and looking, half laughingly, at Max.

"What's the matter, my dear? Isn't the world being nice and pretty?"

"I want my coffee, and I want to put my feet into my pocket--they're like stones...Nothing to eat, thanks--the cake is like underdone india-rubber

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne:

Chapter 4.XIV.

When all was set to rights, I came down stairs again into the basse cour with my valet de place, in order to sally out towards the tomb of the two lovers, &c.--and was a second time stopp'd at the gate--not by the ass--but by the person who struck him; and who, by that time, had taken possession (as is not uncommon after a defeat) of the very spot of ground where the ass stood.

It was a commissary sent to me from the post-office, with a rescript in his hand for the payment of some six livres odd sous.

Upon what account? said I.--'Tis upon the part of the king, replied the commissary, heaving up both his shoulders--