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Today's Stichomancy for William T. Sherman

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson by Robert Louis Stevenson:

Molokai, hearing native causes, and giving my opinion as AMICUS CURIAE as to the interpretation of a statute in English; a lovely week among God's best - at least God's sweetest works - Polynesians. It has bettered me greatly. If I could only stay there the time that remains, I could get my work done and be happy; but the care of my family keeps me in vile Honolulu, where I am always out of sorts, amidst heat and cold and cesspools and beastly HAOLES. What is a haole? You are one; and so, I am sorry to say, am I. After so long a dose of whites, it was a blessing to get among Polynesians again even for a week.

Well, Charles, there are waur haoles than yoursel', I'll say that

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Rig Veda:

Accept for thy delight the proffered Soma meath: drink from the Kindler's bowl and fill thee with thy share.

5 This is the strengthener of thy body's manly might: strength, victory for all time are placed within thine arms. Pressed for thee, Maghavan, it is offered unto thee: drink from the chalice of this Brahman, drink thy fill.

6 Accept the sacrifice; mark both of you, my call: the Priest hath seated him after the ancient texts.


The Rig Veda
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Poems of William Blake by William Blake:

With milk and oil I never knew, and therefore did I weep, And I complaind in the mild air, because I fade away. And lay me down in thy cold bed, and leave my shining lot.

Queen of the vales, the matron Clay answered: I heard thy sighs. And all thy moans flew o'er my roof, but I have call'd them down: Wilt thou O Queen enter my house, tis given thee to enter, And to return: fear nothing, enter with thy virgin feet.

IV.

The eternal gates terrific porter lifted the northern bar: Thel enter'd in & saw the secrets of the land unknown; She saw the couches of the dead, & where the fibrous roots


Poems of William Blake