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Today's Stichomancy for Barbara Streisand

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Road to Oz by L. Frank Baum:

While he waited he returned to the beautiful sitting room and ate several of the red-cheeked apples to pass away the time.

Meanwhile, Dorothy had dressed herself in a pretty gown of soft grey embroidered with silver, and put a blue-and-gold suit of satin upon little Button-Bright, who looked as sweet as a cherub in it. Followed by the boy and Toto--the dog with a new green ribbon around his neck--she hastened down to the splendid drawing-room of the palace, where, seated upon an exquisite throne of carved malachite and nestled amongst its green satin cushions was the lovely Princess Ozma, waiting eagerly to welcome her friend.

20. Princess Ozma Of Oz

The Road to Oz
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Market-Place by Harold Frederic:

bigger than being 'nice.'"

"I withdraw the word immediately--unreservedly," she put in, with a smile in which he read that genial mockery he knew so well.

"You laugh at me--whenever I try to talk seriously," he objected.

"I laugh?" she queried, with an upward glance of demurely simulated amazement. "Impossible! I assure you I've forgotten how."

"Ah, now we get to it!" he broke out, with energy. "You're really feeling about it just as I am.

The Market-Place
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Beauty and The Beast by Bayard Taylor:

the apples from his own orchard and water from his well. There was an entire absence of conventionality at our meetings, and this, conpared with the somewhat stiff society of the village, was really an attraction. There was a mystic bond of union in our ideas: we discussed life, love, religion, and the future state, not only with the utmost candor, but with a warmth of feeling which, in many of us, was genuine. Even I (and you know how painfully shy and bashful I was) felt myself more at home there than in my father's house; and if I didn't talk much, I had a pleasant feeling of being in harmony with those who did.

"Well, 'twas in the early part of '45--I think in April,--when we