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Today's Stichomancy for Carmen Electra

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Extracts From Adam's Diary by Mark Twain:


She doesn't work Sundays, but lies around all tired out, and likes to have the fish wallow over her; and she makes fool noises to amuse it, and pretends to chew its paws, and that makes it laugh. I have not seen a fish before that could laugh. This makes me doubt. ... I have come to like Sunday myself. Superintending all the week tires a body so. There ought to be more Sundays. In the old days they were tough, but now they come handy.


It isn't a fish. I cannot quite make out what it is. It makes curious, devilish noises when not satisfied, and says "goo-goo"

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Menexenus by Plato:

And first as to their birth. Their ancestors were not strangers, nor are these their descendants sojourners only, whose fathers have come from another country; but they are the children of the soil, dwelling and living in their own land. And the country which brought them up is not like other countries, a stepmother to her children, but their own true mother; she bore them and nourished them and received them, and in her bosom they now repose. It is meet and right, therefore, that we should begin by praising the land which is their mother, and that will be a way of praising their noble birth.

The country is worthy to be praised, not only by us, but by all mankind; first, and above all, as being dear to the Gods. This is proved by the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Vailima Letters by Robert Louis Stevenson:

conviction, and a fine sense of order. No historian I have ever read is so minute; yet he never gives you a word about the people; his interest is entirely limited in the concatenation of events, into which he goes with a lucid, almost superhuman, and wholly ghostly gusto. 'By the ghost of a mathematician' the book might be announced. A very brave, honest book.

Your letter to hand.

Fact is, I don't like the picter. O, it's a good picture, but if you ASK me, you know, I believe, stoutly believe, that mankind, including you, are going mad, I am not in the midst