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Today's Stichomancy for Charles Manson

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne:

"Without losing a second."

Every precaution was taken to keep the corvette almost completely motionless. Before trying to seize the projectile, Engineer Murchison wanted to find its exact position at the bottom of the ocean. The submarine apparatus destined for this expedition was supplied with air. The working of these engines was not without danger, for at 20,000 feet below the surface of the water, and under such great pressure, they were exposed to fracture, the consequences of which would be dreadful.

J. T. Maston, the brothers Blomsberry, and Engineer Murchison, without heeding these dangers, took their places in the


From the Earth to the Moon
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Poor and Proud by Oliver Optic:

at three o'clock; and I want to tell you about my plan too, mother."

The active little girl made a cup of tea for her mother, and the dinner was soon dispatched.

CHAPTER VI.

KATY PREPARES A STOCK OF MERCHANDISE.

Katy had not time then to tell her mother about the candy speculation she had in view, and she was obliged to wait till her return from Temple Street. Promptly at the hour, she presented herself at Mrs. Gordon's, and they went to the house of the mayor; but that distinguished gentleman was not at home, and the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Court Life in China by Isaac Taylor Headland:

the wives and daughters of his dead brother who make their home with him, entered in an orderly way and took their seats. When the teacher came into the room the ladies all arose and remained standing until she took her place before her desk and made a low bow to which they all responded in unison. This is the custom in all of the schools I have visited. Even where the superintendent is Chinese, the pupils stand and make a low Japanese bow at the beginning and close of each recitation.

"How long has the school been in session?" I asked the Princess.

"Three and a half months," she replied.

"And they have done all this embroidery and painting in that