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Today's Stichomancy for David Beckham

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Personal Record by Joseph Conrad:

even the banjo lost its charm since there was nothing to prevent his strumming on it all the time between the meals. The good Paramor--he was really a most excellent fellow--became unhappy as far as was possible to his cheery nature, till one dreary day I suggested, out of sheer mischief, that he should employ the dormant energies of the crew in hauling both cables up on deck and turning them end for end.

For a moment Mr. Paramor was radiant. "Excellent idea!" but directly his face fell. "Why . . . Yes! But we can't make that job last more than three days," he muttered, discontentedly. I don't know how long he expected us to be stuck on the riverside


A Personal Record
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Daisy Miller by Henry James:

done that for dresses. I am sure they send all the pretty ones to America; you see the most frightful things here. The only thing I don't like," she proceeded, "is the society. There isn't any society; or, if there is, I don't know where it keeps itself. Do you? I suppose there is some society somewhere, but I haven't seen anything of it. I'm very fond of society, and I have always had a great deal of it. I don't mean only in Schenectady, but in New York. I used to go to New York every winter. In New York I had lots of society. Last winter I had seventeen dinners given me; and three of them were by gentlemen," added Daisy Miller.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Time Machine by H. G. Wells:

Dimensions. Long ago I had a vague inkling of a machine--'

`To travel through Time!' exclaimed the Very Young Man.

`That shall travel indifferently in any direction of Space and Time, as the driver determines.'

Filby contented himself with laughter.

`But I have experimental verification,' said the Time Traveller.

`It would be remarkably convenient for the historian,' the Psychologist suggested. `One might travel back and verify the accepted account of the Battle of Hastings, for instance!'

`Don't you think you would attract attention?' said the Medical


The Time Machine