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Today's Stichomancy for Edward Norton

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin:

supposed to have produced two varieties, namely m2 and s2, differing from each other, and more considerably from their common parent (A). We may continue the process by similar steps for any length of time; some of the varieties, after each thousand generations, producing only a single variety, but in a more and more modified condition, some producing two or three varieties, and some failing to produce any. Thus the varieties or modified descendants, proceeding from the common parent (A), will generally go on increasing in number and diverging in character. In the diagram the process is represented up to the ten-thousandth generation, and under a condensed and simplified form up to the fourteen-thousandth generation.

But I must here remark that I do not suppose that the process ever goes on


On the Origin of Species
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Tono Bungay by H. G. Wells:

sheepish, in the other.

Beckenham, in the persons of a vicar, a doctor's wife, and a large proud lady called Hogberry, "called" on my uncle and aunt almost at once, so soon in fact as the lawn was down again, and afterwards my aunt made friends with a quiet gentlewoman next door, a propos of an overhanging cherry tree and the need of repairing the party fence. So she resumed her place in society from which she had fallen with the disaster of Wimblehurst. She made a partially facetious study of the etiquette of her position, had cards engraved and retaliated calls. And then she received a card for one of Mrs. Hogberry's At Homes, gave an old

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Sylvie and Bruno by Lewis Carroll:

"The name was Lady Muriel Orme. As to what she was like--well, I thought her very beautiful. Do you know her?"

"Yes--I do know her." And the grave Doctor coloured slightly as he added "Yes, I agree with you. She is beautiful."

"I quite lost my heart to her!" I went on mischievously. "We talked--"

"Have some supper!" Arthur interrupted with an air of relief, as the maid entered with the tray. And he steadily resisted all my attempts to return to the subject of Lady Muriel until the evening had almost worn itself away. Then, as we sat gazing into the fire, and conversation was lapsing into silence, he made a hurried confession.

"I hadn't meant to tell you anything about her," he said (naming no


Sylvie and Bruno