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Today's Stichomancy for Elizabeth Taylor

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Cromwell by William Shakespeare:

Mark the end.

NORFOLK. I promise you, I like not something he hath done, But let that pass; the King doth love him well.

CROMWELL. God morrow to my Lord of Winchester. I know you bear me hard about the Abbey lands.

GARDINER. Have I not reason, when religion is wronged? You had no colour for what you have done.

CROMWELL.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Herodias by Gustave Flaubert:

The gorgeous litter, borne by eight men, came to a halt. From it descended a youth. He wore many pearls upon his fingers, but he had a protruding abdomen and his face was covered with pimples. A cup of aromatic wine was offered to him. He drank it, and asked for a second draught.

The tetrarch had fallen upon his knees before the proconsul, saying that he was grieved beyond words not to have known sooner of the favour of his presence within those domains; had he been aware of the approach of his distinguished guest, he would have issued a command that every person along the route should place himself at the proconsul's orders. Of a surety, the proconsul's family was descended


Herodias
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Golden Sayings of Epictetus by Epictetus:

deserves your attention most in the last thing to gain it; that you know not good from evil, and are in short a hapless wretch; a fine way to apply! though unless the words of the Philosopher affect you thus, speaker and speech are alike dead.

CXXI

A Philosopher's school is a Surgery: pain, not pleasure, you should have felt therein. For on entering none of you is whole. One has a shoulder out of joint, another an abscess: a third suffers from an issue, a fourth from pains in the head. And am I then to sit down and treat you to pretty sentiments and empty flourishes, so that you may applaud me and depart, with neither


The Golden Sayings of Epictetus