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Today's Stichomancy for James Brown

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from On Horsemanship by Xenophon:

{xephos}. "Cyrop." I. ii. 13.

Again, in place of the long reed spear, which is apt to be weak and awkward to carry, we would substitute two darts of cornel-wood;[10] the one of which the skilful horseman can let fly, and still ply the one reserved in all directions, forwards, backwards,[11] and obliquely; add to that, these smaller weapons are not only stronger than the spear but far more manageable.

[10] For these reforms, the result of the author's Asiatic experiences perhaps, cf. "Hell." III. iv. 14; "Anab." I. viii. 3; "Cyrop." I. ii. 9.

[11] Reading {eis toupisthen} after Leoncl.


On Horsemanship
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe:

Going one day through Aldgate, and a pretty many people being passing and repassing, there comes a man out of the end of the Minories, and looking a little up the street and down, he throws his hands abroad, 'Lord, what an alteration is here I Why, last week I came along here, and hardly anybody was to he seen.' Another man - I heard him - adds to his words, "Tis all wonderful; 'tis all a dream.' 'Blessed be God,' says a third man, d and let us give thanks to Him, for 'tis all His own doing, human help and human skill was at an end.' These were all strangers to one another. But such salutations as these were frequent in the street every day; and in spite of a loose behaviour, the very common people went along the streets giving God


A Journal of the Plague Year
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne:

an abundant harvest of what looked like human beings, armed with helmets and breastplates, shields, swords, and spears; and before they were well out of the earth, they brandished their weapons, and clashed them one against another, seeming to think, little while as they had yet lived, that they had wasted too much of life without a battle. Every tooth of the dragon had produced one of these sons of deadly mischief.

Up sprouted also a great many trumpeters; and with the first breath that they drew, they put their brazen trumpets to their lips, and sounded a tremendous and ear-shattering blast, so that the whole space, just now so quiet and solitary,


Tanglewood Tales