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Today's Stichomancy for Jennifer Aniston

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:

sounds with an air of melancholy, he took the pail from her head and bore it to the cottage himself. She followed, and they disappeared. Presently I saw the young man again, with some tools in his hand, cross the field behind the cottage; and the girl was also busied, sometimes in the house and sometimes in the yard. "On examining my dwelling, I found that one of the windows of the cottage had formerly occupied a part of it, but the panes had been filled up with wood. In one of these was a small and almost imperceptible chink through which the eye could just penetrate. Through this crevice a small room was visible, whitewashed and clean but very bare of furniture. In one corner, near a small


Frankenstein
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

Thus is the shepherd beaten from thy side, And wolves are gnarling who shall gnaw thee first. Ah, that my fear were false! ah, that it were! For, good King Henry, thy decay I fear.

[Exit, guarded.]

KING. My lords, what to your wisdoms seemeth best, Do or undo, as if ourself were here.

QUEEN. What, will your highness leave the parliament?

KING.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Iron Puddler by James J. Davis:

farthest thing from the truth. The picture was drawn by malice and not from a desire to tell the truth.

I learned that when Mr. Reid and his fellows gave their word they never broke it. It was hard to get a promise from them, but once they made a promise they always fulfilled it. If they said they would meet us at a certain hour, they were always there on the minute. They were patient, firm and reasonable, and they always treated us as their equals.

They always gave us the reasons for the stand they took. At first I doubted their sincerity, but in the end I learned that the reasons they cited were the true reasons. At first they