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Today's Stichomancy for Jessica Alba

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Ten Years Later by Alexandre Dumas:

would have been satisfied with them, but D'Artagnan was brave enough to ask himself sincerely and conscientiously if he were brave. Therefore to this: --

"But it appears to me that I drew promptly enough and cut and thrust pretty freely on the Place de Greve to be satisfied of my bravery," D'Artagnan had himself replied. "Gently, captain, that is not an answer. I was brave that day, because they were burning my house, and there are a hundred, and even a thousand, to speak against one, that if those gentlemen of the riots had not formed that unlucky idea, their plan of attack would have succeeded, or, at


Ten Years Later
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte:

myself; but that idea gave me confidence to ask, and power to hope I did not ask in vain. As for the primroses, I kept two of them in a glass in my room until they were completely withered, and the housemaid threw them out; and the petals of the other I pressed between the leaves of my Bible - I have them still, and mean to keep them always.

CHAPTER XIV - THE RECTOR

THE following day was as fine as the preceding one. Soon after breakfast Miss Matilda, having galloped and blundered through a few unprofitable lessons, and vengeably thumped the piano for an hour, in a terrible humour with both me and it, because her mamma would


Agnes Grey
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Wrong Box by Stevenson & Osbourne:

solemn hour I can lay my hand upon my heart without a blush. Except on the really trifling point of the smuggling of the Hercules (and even of that I now humbly repent), my life has been entirely fit for publication. I never feared the light,' cried the little man; 'and now--now--!'

'Cheer up, old boy,' said Michael. 'I assure you we should count this little contretemps a trifle at the office; it's the sort of thing that may occur to any one; and if you're perfectly sure you had no hand in it--'

'What language am I to find--' began Pitman.

'O, I'll do that part of it,' interrupted Michael, 'you have no