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Today's Stichomancy for John Travolta

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Herland by Charlotte Gilman:

women and agile foresters, all over the country, as well as those in the towns, and everywhere there was the same high level of intelligence. Some knew far more than others about one thing-- they were specialized, of course; but all of them knew more about everything--that is, about everything the country was acquainted with--than is the case with us.

We boast a good deal of our "high level of general intelligence" and our "compulsory public education," but in proportion to their opportunities they were far better educated than our people.

With what we told them, from what sketches and models we were able to prepare, they constructed a sort of working outline


Herland
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom by William and Ellen Craft:

from him, and he could never learn where the poor creature dwelt. So after remaining single for many years, both before and after his escape, and never ex- pecting to see again, nor even to hear from, his long- lost partner, he finally married a woman at St. John's. But, poor fellow, as he was passing down the street one day, he met a woman; at the first glance they nearly recognized each other; they both turned round and stared, and unconsciously advanced, till she screamed and flew into his arms. Her first words were, "Dear, are you married?" On his


Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Aesop's Fables by Aesop:

way. But soon they passed a group of men, one of whom said: "See that lazy youngster, he lets his father walk while he rides."

So the Man ordered his Boy to get off, and got on himself. But they hadn't gone far when they passed two women, one of whom said to the other: "Shame on that lazy lout to let his poor little son trudge along."

Well, the Man didn't know what to do, but at last he took his Boy up before him on the Donkey. By this time they had come to the town, and the passers-by began to jeer and point at them. The Man stopped and asked what they were scoffing at. The men said: "Aren't you ashamed of yourself for overloading that poor donkey


Aesop's Fables