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Today's Stichomancy for Julia Roberts

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare:

Which neuer labour'd in their mindes till now; And now haue toyled their vnbreathed memories With this same play, against your nuptiall

The. And we will heare it

Hip. No my noble Lord, it is not for you. I haue heard It ouer, and it is nothing, nothing in the world; Vnless you can finde sport in their intents, Extreamely stretched, and cond with cruell paine, To doe you seruice

Thes. I will heare that play. For neuer any thing Can be amisse, when simplenesse and duty tender it.


A Midsummer Night's Dream
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen:

and I like them as such. If a speech be well drawn up, I read it with pleasure, by whomsoever it may be made--and probably with much greater, if the production of Mr. Hume or Mr. Robertson, than if the genuine words of Caractacus, Agricola, or Alfred the Great."

"You are fond of history! And so are Mr. Allen and my father; and I have two brothers who do not dislike it. So many instances within my small circle of friends is remarkable! At this rate, I shall not pity the writers of history any longer. If people like to read their books, it is all very well, but to be at so much trouble in filling


Northanger Abbey
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott:

agility the want of strength, and little noticed by the men-at-arms, who were busied in their more important object, hovered on the skirts of the fight, and effectually checked the fatal career of the Blue Knight, by hamstringing his horse with a stroke of his sword. Horse and man went to the ground; yet the situation of the Knight of the Fetterlock continued very precarious, as he was pressed close by several men completely armed, and began to be fatigued by the violent exertions necessary to defend himself on so many points at nearly the same


Ivanhoe