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Today's Stichomancy for Laurence Fishburne

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Cavalry General by Xenophon:

must discover umpires of such high order that to win their verdict will be as precious to the victor as victory itself.

[37] See "Hell." III. iv. 15; "Hiero," ix. 3; "Cyrop." I. vi. 18; Martin, op. cit. p. 260 f.

II

Given, then, that your troopers are thoroughly trained in all the above particulars, it is necessary, I presume, that they should further be instructed in a type of evolution the effect of which will show itself not only in the splendour of the great processions[1] in honour of the gods, but in the manouvres of the exercising-ground; in the valorous onslaught of real battle when occasion calls; and in the

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Divine Comedy (translated by H.F. Cary) by Dante Alighieri:

Desire, ne'er since extinct in me, to hear Renew'd the strain. Then parting from the rest One near us drew, and sole began: "We all Are ready at thy pleasure, well dispos'd To do thee gentle service. We are they, To whom thou in the world erewhile didst Sing 'O ye! whose intellectual ministry Moves the third heaven!' and in one orb we roll, One motion, one impulse, with those who rule Princedoms in heaven; yet are of love so full, That to please thee 't will be as sweet to rest."


The Divine Comedy (translated by H.F. Cary)
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Ruling Passion by Henry van Dyke:

understand; it was a work of four days, and she spoke much.

"The first day it was at the Island House; we were trolling for ouananiche, and she was not pleased, for she lost many of the fish. I was smoking at the stern of the canoe, and she said that the tobacco was a filthy weed, that it grew in the devil's garden, and that it smelled bad, terribly bad, and that it made the air sick, and that even the pig would not eat it."

I could imagine Patrick's dismay as he listened to this dissertation; for in his way he was as sensitive as a woman, and he would rather have been upset in his canoe than have exposed himself to the reproach of offending any one of his patrons by unpleasant or