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Today's Stichomancy for Liam Neeson

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad:

the crania of those going out there,' he said. `And when they come back, too?' I asked. `Oh, I never see them,' he remarked; `and, moreover, the changes take place inside, you know.' He smiled, as if at some quiet joke. `So you are going out there. Famous. Interesting, too.' He gave me a searching glance, and made another note. `Ever any madness in your family?' he asked, in a matter-of-fact tone. I felt very annoyed. `Is that question in the interests of science, too?' `It would be,' he said, without taking notice of my irritation, `interesting for science to watch the mental changes of individuals, on the spot, but . . .' `Are you an alienist?'


Heart of Darkness
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Tao Teh King by Lao-tze:

49. 1. The sage has no invariable mind of his own; he makes the mind of the people his mind.

2. To those who are good (to me), I am good; and to those who are not good (to me), I am also good;--and thus (all) get to be good. To those who are sincere (with me), I am sincere; and to those who are not sincere (with me), I am also sincere;--and thus (all) get to be sincere.

3. The sage has in the world an appearance of indecision, and keeps his mind in a state of indifference to all. The people all keep their eyes and ears directed to him, and he deals with them all as his children.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Happy Prince and Other Tales by Oscar Wilde:

good story-teller nowadays starts with the end, and then goes on to the beginning, and concludes with the middle. That is the new method. I heard all about it the other day from a critic who was walking round the pond with a young man. He spoke of the matter at great length, and I am sure he must have been right, for he had blue spectacles and a bald head, and whenever the young man made any remark, he always answered 'Pooh!' But pray go on with your story. I like the Miller immensely. I have all kinds of beautiful sentiments myself, so there is a great sympathy between us."

"Well," said the Linnet, hopping now on one leg and now on the other, "as soon as the winter was over, and the primroses began to