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Today's Stichomancy for Madonna

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Emma by Jane Austen:

wrapt up in her family; a devoted wife, a doating mother, and so tenderly attached to her father and sister that, but for these higher ties, a warmer love might have seemed impossible. She could never see a fault in any of them. She was not a woman of strong understanding or any quickness; and with this resemblance of her father, she inherited also much of his constitution; was delicate in her own health, over-careful of that of her children, had many fears and many nerves, and was as fond of her own Mr. Wingfield in town as her father could be of Mr. Perry. They were alike too, in a general benevolence of temper, and a strong habit of regard for every old acquaintance.


Emma
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne:

was all that could be heard, and scarcely heard sighing amid a desolate silence. But even when the minister's voice grew high and commanding -- when it gushed irrepressibly upward -- when it assumed its utmost breadth and power, so overfilling the church as to burst its way through the solid walls, and diffuse itself in the open air -- still, if the auditor listened intently, and for the purpose, he could detect the same cry of pain. What was it? The complaint of a human heart, sorrow-laden, perchance guilty, telling its secret, whether of guilt or sorrow, to the great heart of mankind; beseeching its sympathy or forgiveness, -- at every moment, -- in each accent, -- and never in vain! It


The Scarlet Letter
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Cromwell by William Shakespeare:

I pray, excuse me; this shall well suffice To bear my charges to Bononia, Whereas a noble Earl is much distressed: An Englishman, Russell, the Earl of Bedford, Is by the French King sold unto his death: It may fall out, that I may do him good; To save his life, I'll hazard my heart blood. Therefore, kind sir, thanks for your liberal gift; I must be gone to aide him; there's no shift.

FRISKIBALL. I'll be no hinderer to so good an act.