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Today's Stichomancy for Matt Damon

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from King Lear by William Shakespeare:

Glou. I am tied to th' stake, and I must stand the course. Reg. Wherefore to Dover, sir? Glou. Because I would not see thy cruel nails Pluck out his poor old eyes; nor thy fierce sister In his anointed flesh stick boarish fangs. The sea, with such a storm as his bare head In hell-black night endur'd, would have buoy'd up And quench'd the steeled fires. Yet, poor old heart, he holp the heavens to rain. If wolves had at thy gate howl'd that stern time, Thou shouldst have said, 'Good porter, turn the key.'


King Lear
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Of The Nature of Things by Lucretius:

Will I persuade thee that up-rise together, With clouds themselves, full many seeds of water From out all things, and that they both increase- Both clouds and water which is in the clouds- In like proportion, as our frames increase In like proportion with our blood, as well As sweat or any moisture in our members. Besides, the clouds take in from time to time Much moisture risen from the broad marine,- Whilst the winds bear them o'er the mighty sea, Like hanging fleeces of white wool. Thuswise,


Of The Nature of Things
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Plain Tales from the Hills by Rudyard Kipling:

Handicappers had done their work well. The Honorary Secretary shouted himself hoarse through the din; and the smoke of the cheroots was like the smoke, and the rattling of the dice-boxes like the rattle of small-arm fire.

Ten horses started--very level--and Regula Baddun's owner cantered out on his back to a place inside the circle of the course, where two bricks had been thrown. He faced towards the brick-mounds at the lower end of the course and waited.

The story of the running is in the Pioneer. At the end of the first mile, Shackles crept out of the ruck, well on the outside, ready to get round the turn, lay hold of the bit and spin up the straight