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Today's Stichomancy for Michael Moore

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Golden Sayings of Epictetus by Epictetus:

is to be found the real nature of the Good. What then is the real nature of God?--Intelligence, Knowledge, Right Reason. Here then without more ado seek the real nature of the Good. For surely thou dost not seek it in a plant or in an animal that reasoneth not.

LX

Seek then the real nature of the Good in that without whose presence thou wilt not admit the Good to exist in aught else.-- What then? Are not these other things also works of God?--They are; but not preferred to honour, nor are they portions of God. But thou art a thing preferred to honour: thou art thyself a


The Golden Sayings of Epictetus
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from On Horsemanship by Xenophon:

[14] Reading {allo}. Al. reading {allos} with L. D., "and the same horse will at one time humour you in one way and again in another." Cf. viii. 13, x. 12, for {uperetein} of the horse.

VII

The master, let us suppose, has received his horse and is ready to mount.[1] We will now prescribe certain rules to be observed in the interests not only of the horseman but of the animal which he bestrides. First, then, he should take the leading rein, which hangs from the chin-strap or nose-band,[2] conveniently in his left hand, held slack so as not to jerk the horse's mouth, whether he means to mount by hoisting himself up, catching hold of the mane behind the


On Horsemanship
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Venus and Adonis by William Shakespeare:

Saw'st thou not signs of fear lurk in mine eye? 644 Grew I not faint? And fell I not downright? Within my bosom, whereon thou dost lie, My boding heart pants, beats, and takes no rest, But, like an earthquake, shakes thee on my breast.

'For where Love reigns, disturbing Jealousy 649 Doth call himself Affection's sentinel; Gives false alarms, suggesteth mutiny, And in a peaceful hour doth cry "Kill, kill!" 652 Distempering gentle Love in his desire, As air and water do abate the fire.