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Today's Stichomancy for Mike Myers

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Idylls of the King by Alfred Tennyson:

So said he, and the barge with oar and sail Moved from the brink, like some full-breasted swan That, fluting a wild carol ere her death, Ruffles her pure cold plume, and takes the flood With swarthy webs. Long stood Sir Bedivere Revolving many memories, till the hull Looked one black dot against the verge of dawn, And on the mere the wailing died away.

But when that moan had past for evermore, The stillness of the dead world's winter dawn Amazed him, and he groaned, 'The King is gone.'

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley:

about with lockets of Charles the First's hair (or of somebody else's, when the Jews' genuine stock is used up), inscribed with the neat and appropriate legend - which indeed is popular through all that land, and which, I hope, you will learn to translate in due time and to perpend likewise:-

"VICTRIX CAUSA DIIS PLACUIT, SED VICTA PUELLIS."

When he got into the middle of the town, they all set on him at once, to show him his way; or rather, to show him that he did not know his way; for as for asking him what way he wanted to go, no one ever thought of that.

But one pulled him hither, and another poked him thither, and a

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Mad King by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

ise you made my father--command her to wed me at once."

Von der Tann looked the king straight in the eyes.

"I cannot do that," he said. "She has told me that she will kill herself rather than wed with your majesty. She is all I have left, sire. What good would be accomplished by rob- bing me of her if you could not gain her by the act? Win her confidence and love, sire. It may be done. Thus only may happiness result to you and to her."

"You see," exclaimed the king, "what your loyalty amounts to! I believe that you are saving her for the impostor--I have heard as much hinted at before this. Nor do I doubt


The Mad King