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Today's Stichomancy for Monica Potter

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Astoria by Washington Irving:

distance. Here leveling his rifle he took so sure an aim, that the bighorn fell dead on the spot; a fortunate circumstance, for, to pursue it, if merely wounded, would have been impossible in his emaciated state. The declivity of the hill enabled him to roll the carcass down to his companions, who were too feeble to climb the rocks. They fell to work to cut it up; yet exerted a remarkable self-denial for men in their starving condition, for they contented themselves for the present with a soup made from the bones, reserving the flesh for future repasts. This providential relief gave them strength to pursue their journey, but they were frequently reduced to almost equal straits, and it

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay:

still he did not dare to admit to himself Krag's seriousness.

He heard his parting remarks in deep abstraction, and only after the lapse of several minutes, when, alone with Nightspore, did he realise that they referred to such mundane matters as travelling routes and times of trains.

"Does Krag travel north with us, Nightspore? I didn't catch that."

"No. We go on first, and he joins us at Starkness on the evening of the day after tomorrow."

Maskull remained thoughtful. "What am I to think of that man?"

"For your information," replied Nightspore wearily, "I have never known him to lie."

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from On Horsemanship by Xenophon:

slightly upwards. The dart so discharged will carry with the greatest force and to the farthest distance; we may add, too, with the truest aim, if at the moment of discharge the lance be directed steadily on the object aimed at.[13]

[12] Al. "to turn right-about."

[13] "If the lance is steadily eyeing the mark at the instant of discharge."

This treatise, consisting of notes and suggestions, lessons and exercises suited to a private individual, must come to a conclusion; the theory and practice of the matter suited to a cavalry commander will be found developed in the companion treatise.[14]


On Horsemanship