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Today's Stichomancy for Monica Potter

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Vicar of Tours by Honore de Balzac:

la Psalette, by which pedestrians passed from the Cloister to the Grand'Rue. The name of this street, proves clearly enough that the precentor and his pupils and those connected with the choir formerly lived there. The other side, the left side, of the street is occupied by a single house, the walls of which are overshadowed by the buttresses of Saint-Gatien, which have their base in the narrow little garden of the house, leaving it doubtful whether the cathedral was built before or after this venerable dwelling. An archaeologist examining the arabesques, the shape of the windows, the arch of the door, the whole exterior of the house, now mellow with age, would see at once that it had always been a part of the magnificent edifice with

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Emma by Jane Austen:

so pleasant as I had hoped--`Not better' was my answer."

His face lengthened immediately; and his voice was the voice of sentiment as he answered.

"Oh! no--I am grieved to find--I was on the point of telling you that when I called at Mrs. Goddard's door, which I did the very last thing before I returned to dress, I was told that Miss Smith was not better, by no means better, rather worse. Very much grieved and concerned-- I had flattered myself that she must be better after such a cordial as I knew had been given her in the morning."

Emma smiled and answered--"My visit was of use to the nervous part of her complaint, I hope; but not even I can charm away a sore throat;


Emma
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Child of Storm by H. Rider Haggard:

rock above a river. O my brother Umbelazi, I mourn for you, my brother, for, after all, we played together when we were little and loved each other once, who in the end fought for a toy that is called a throne, since, as our father said, two bulls cannot live in the same yard, my brother. Well, you are gone and I remain, yet who knows but that at the last your lot may be happier than mine. You died of a broken heart, Umbelazi, but of what shall _I_ die, I wonder?"*

[*--That history of Cetewayo's fall and tragic death and of Zikali's vengeance I hope to write one day, for in these events also I was destined to play a part.--A. Q.]

I have given this interview in detail, since it was because of it that


Child of Storm