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Today's Stichomancy for Paul McCartney

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Richard III by William Shakespeare:

Give me some ink and paper. What, is my beaver easier than it was? And all my armour laid into my tent? CATESBY. It is, my liege; and all things are in readiness. KING RICHARD. Good Norfolk, hie thee to thy charge; Use careful watch, choose trusty sentinels. NORFOLK. I go, my lord. KING RICHARD. Stir with the lark to-morrow, gentle Norfolk. NORFOLK. I warrant you, my lord. Exit KING RICHARD. Catesby! CATESBY. My lord?


Richard III
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Rinkitink In Oz by L. Frank Baum:

right. Never question the truth of what you fail to understand, for the world is filled with wonders."

"I crave your pardon, dear father," said the Prince, "for clearly I heard the pearl speak, and its words were full of wisdom."

"The powers of the other pearls are even greater," resumed the King. "Were I poor in all else, these gems would make me richer than any other monarch the world holds."

"I believe that," replied Inga, looking at the beautiful pearls with much awe. "But tell me, my


Rinkitink In Oz
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Snow Image by Nathaniel Hawthorne:

Peony in the garden, the child had run across the street to play with them. So this kind lady went to the door, intending to invite the little runaway into her comfortable parlor; for, now that the sunshine was withdrawn, the atmosphere, out of doors, was already growing very cold.

But, after opening the house-door, she stood an instant on the threshold, hesitating whether she ought to ask the child to come in, or whether she should even speak to her. Indeed, she almost doubted whether it were a real child after all, or only a light wreath of the new-fallen snow, blown hither and thither about the garden by the intensely cold west-wind. There was certainly


The Snow Image