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Today's Stichomancy for Ringo Starr

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Falk by Joseph Conrad:

the necessity. How Falk had managed to turn the girl's head was more difficult to understand. I sup- posed Hermann would know. And then hadn't there been Miss Vanlo? It could not be his silvery tongue, or the subtle seduction of his manner; he had no more of what is called "manner" than an animal--which, however, on the other hand, is never, and can never be called vulgar. Therefore it must have been his bodily appearance, exhibiting a virility of nature as exaggerated as his beard, and resembling a sort of constant ruthlessness. It was


Falk
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Girl with the Golden Eyes by Honore de Balzac:

oracles which fatality sometimes allows. The /City of Paris/ has her great mast, all of bronze, carved with victories, and for watchman-- Napoleon. The barque may roll and pitch, but she cleaves the world, illuminates it through the hundred mouths of her tribunes, ploughs the seas of science, rides with full sail, cries from the height of her tops, with the voice of her scientists and artists: "Onward, advance! Follow me!" She carries a huge crew, which delights in adorning her with fresh streamers. Boys and urchins laughing in the rigging; ballast of heavy /bourgeoisie/; working-men and sailor-men touched with tar; in her cabins the lucky passengers; elegant midshipmen smoke their cigars leaning over the bulwarks; then, on the deck, her


The Girl with the Golden Eyes
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Edition of The Ambassadors by Henry James:

small child of nature at the Geneva school, a little person quite made over (as foreign women WERE, compared with American) by marriage. Her situation too had evidently cleared itself up; there would have been--all that was possible--a judicial separation. She had settled in Paris, brought up her daughter, steered her boat. It was no very pleasant boat--especially there--to be in; but Marie de Vionnet would have headed straight. She would have friends, certainly--and very good ones. There she was at all events--and it was very interesting. Her knowing Mr. Chad didn't in the least prove she hadn't friends; what it proved was what good ones HE had. "I saw that," said Miss Gostrey, "that night at the Francais; it