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Today's Stichomancy for Samuel L. Jackson

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Eugenie Grandet by Honore de Balzac:

truth!"

Eugenie looked at her father with a sarcastic expression that stung him.

"Eugenie, you are here, in my house,--in your father's house. If you wish to stay here, you must submit yourself to me. The priests tell you to obey me." Eugenie bowed her head. "You affront me in all I hold most dear. I will not see you again until you submit. Go to your chamber. You will stay there till I give you permission to leave it. Nanon will bring you bread and water. You hear me--go!"

Eugenie burst into tears and fled up to her mother. Grandet, after marching two or three times round the garden in the snow without


Eugenie Grandet
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Aspern Papers by Henry James:

Cumnor had a theory that she had been a governess in some family in which the poet visited and that, in consequence of her position, there was from the first something unavowed, or rather something positively clandestine, in their relations. I on the other hand had hatched a little romance according to which she was the daughter of an artist, a painter or a sculptor, who had left the western world when the century was fresh, to study in the ancient schools. It was essential to my hypothesis that this amiable man should have lost his wife, should have been poor and unsuccessful and should have had a second daughter, of a disposition quite different from Juliana's. It was also indispensable that he should have been

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Ball at Sceaux by Honore de Balzac:

her to discern them, and for them she put forth so much fascination that, under cover of her charms, she escaped their scrutiny. This enchanting veneer covered a careless heart; the opinion--common to many young girls--that no one else dwelt in a sphere so lofty as to be able to understand the merits of her soul; and a pride based no less on her birth than on her beauty. In the absence of the overwhelming sentiment which, sooner or later, works havoc in a woman's heart, she spent her young ardor in an immoderate love of distinctions, and expressed the deepest contempt for persons of inferior birth. Supremely impertinent to all newly-created nobility, she made every effort to get her parents recognized as equals by the most illustrious