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Today's Stichomancy for Tom Cruise

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen:

not to slacken as a correspondent, it was for the sake of what had been, rather than what was. Charlotte's first letters were received with a good deal of eagerness; there could not but be curiosity to know how she would speak of her new home, how she would like Lady Catherine, and how happy she would dare pronounce herself to be; though, when the letters were read, Elizabeth felt that Charlotte expressed herself on every point exactly as she might have foreseen. She wrote cheerfully, seemed surrounded with comforts, and mentioned nothing which she could not praise. The house, furniture, neighbourhood, and roads, were all to her taste, and Lady Catherine's behaviour was


Pride and Prejudice
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Symposium by Xenophon:

your debtor, since I find him a fine handsome fellow and true gentleman.[106] And did you not, moreover, sing the praises of Aeschylus of Phlius[107] in my ears and mine in his?--in fact, affected us so much by what you said, we fell in love and took to coursing wildly in pursuit of one another like two dogs upon a trail.[108]

[100] Or, "the sage," "the sophist." See "Mem." I. vi. 13; II. i. 21.

[101] See "Mem." IV. iv. 5; and for his art of memory cf. Plat. "Hipp. min." 368 D; "Hipp. maj." 285 E.

[102] The "memoria technica" (see Aristot. "de An." iii. 3, 6), said to have been invented by Simonides of Ceos. Cic. "de Or." ii. 86;


The Symposium
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Meno by Plato:

SOCRATES: Then, as we are agreed that a man should enquire about that which he does not know, shall you and I make an effort to enquire together into the nature of virtue?

MENO: By all means, Socrates. And yet I would much rather return to my original question, Whether in seeking to acquire virtue we should regard it as a thing to be taught, or as a gift of nature, or as coming to men in some other way?

SOCRATES: Had I the command of you as well as of myself, Meno, I would not have enquired whether virtue is given by instruction or not, until we had first ascertained 'what it is.' But as you think only of controlling me who am your slave, and never of controlling yourself,--such being your