.
Tarot Runes I Ching Stichomancy Contact
Store Numerology Coin Flip Yes or No Webmasters
Personal Celebrity Biorhythms Bibliomancy Settings

Today's Stichomancy for Vladimir Putin

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Cousin Betty by Honore de Balzac:

in reserve, no doubt--in his fish-pond--his /Parc-aux-cerfs/! He is very Louis XV., is my gentleman. He is in luck to be so handsome!-- However, he is ageing; his face shows it.--He has taken up with some little milliner?"

"Dear me, no," replied Lisbeth.

"Oh!" cried Crevel, "what would I not do to hinder him from hanging up his hat! I could not win back Josepha; women of that kind never come back to their first love.--Besides, it is truly said, such a return is not love.--But, Cousin Betty, I would pay down fifty thousand francs-- that is to say, I would spend it--to rob that great good-looking fellow of his mistress, and to show him that a Major with a portly

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Buttered Side Down by Edna Ferber:

stopped talking baseball and sat up and took notice. Pearlie had known all those young men inside of the swagger suits in the days when their summer costume consisted of a pair of dad's pants cut down to a doubtful fit, and a nondescript shirt damp from the swimming-hole. So she called out, cheerily:

"We're going over to the strawberry festival. I expect to see all you boys there to contribute your mite to the church carpet."

The leading lady turned to look at them, and smiled. They were such a dapper, pink-cheeked, clean-looking lot of boys, she thought. At that the benches rose to a man and announced that they might as well stroll over right now. Whenever a new girl comes to


Buttered Side Down
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift:

slow and perplexed in their conceptions upon all other subjects, except those of mathematics and music. They are very bad reasoners, and vehemently given to opposition, unless when they happen to be of the right opinion, which is seldom their case. Imagination, fancy, and invention, they are wholly strangers to, nor have any words in their language, by which those ideas can be expressed; the whole compass of their thoughts and mind being shut up within the two forementioned sciences.

Most of them, and especially those who deal in the astronomical part, have great faith in judicial astrology, although they are ashamed to own it publicly. But what I chiefly admired, and


Gulliver's Travels