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Today's Stichomancy for Vladimir Putin

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Tin Woodman of Oz by L. Frank Baum:

said warningly:

"We have powerful friends who will soon come to rescue us."

"Let them come," she returned, with an accent of scorn. "When they get here they will find neither a boy, nor a tin man, nor a scarecrow, for tomorrow morning I intend to transform you all into other shapes, so that you cannot be recognized."

This threat filled them with dismay. The good-natured Giantess was more terrible than they had imagined. She could smile and wear pretty clothes and at the same


The Tin Woodman of Oz
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Of The Nature of Things by Lucretius:

Culls from the level main, he still will take From off the waves in such a wide expanse Abundantly. Then, further, also winds, Sweeping the level waters, can bear off A mighty part of wet, since we behold Oft in a single night the highways dried By winds, and soft mud crusted o'er at dawn. Again, I've taught thee that the clouds bear off Much moisture too, up-taken from the reaches Of the mighty main, and sprinkle it about O'er all the zones, when rain is on the lands


Of The Nature of Things
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from An Unsocial Socialist by George Bernard Shaw:

more food to enable him to do his work than the ploughman to enable him to do his. He talks of the higher quality of his work, as if the higher quality of it were of his own making--as if it gave him a right to work less for his neighbor than his neighbor works for him--as if the ploughman could not do better without him than he without the ploughman--as if the value of the most celebrated pictures has not been questioned more than that of any straight furrow in the arable world--as if it did not take an apprenticeship of as many years to train the hand and eye of a mason or blacksmith as of an artist--as if, in short, the fellow were a god, as canting brain worshippers have for years past been