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Today's Stichomancy for Charlton Heston

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Odyssey by Homer:

Egypt, about as far as a ship can sail in a day with a good stiff breeze behind her, there is an island called Pharos--it has a good harbour from which vessels can get out into open sea when they have taken in water--and here the gods becalmed me twenty days without so much as a breath of fair wind to help me forward. We should have run clean out of provisions and my men would have starved, if a goddess had not taken pity upon me and saved me in the person of Idothea, daughter to Proteus, the old man of the sea, for she had taken a great fancy to me.

"She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, for the men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the


The Odyssey
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Tarzan the Untamed by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

Bertha Kircher and a hand upon her forehead pushing her head back as he tried to kiss her on the mouth. The girl was struggling against the great brute; but her efforts were futile. Slowly the man's lips were coming closer to hers and slowly, step by step, she was being carried backward.

Schneider heard the noise of the opening and closing door behind him and turned. At sight of this strange officer he dropped the girl and straightened up.

"What is the meaning of this intrusion, Lieutenant?" he de- manded, noting the other's epaulettes. "Leave the room at once."


Tarzan the Untamed
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Two Poets by Honore de Balzac:

Next day, old Sechard made the apprentice move all his own household stuff up into the attic until such time as an empty market cart could take it out on the return journey into the country; and David entered into possession of three bare, unfurnished rooms on the day that saw him installed in the printing-house, without one sou wherewith to pay his men's wages. When he asked his father, as a partner, to contribute his share towards the working expenses, the old man pretended not to understand. He had found the printing-house, he said, and he was not bound to find the money too. He had paid his share. Pressed close by his son's reasoning, he answered that when he himself had paid Rouzeau's widow he had not had a penny left. If he, a poor, ignorant