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Today's Stichomancy for Duke of Wellington

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Enoch Arden, &c. by Alfred Tennyson:

While Ilion like a mist rose into towers. Yet hold me not for ever in thine East: How can my nature longer mix with thine? Coldly thy rosy shadows bathe me, cold Are all thy lights, and cold my wrinkled feet Upon thy glimmering thresholds, when the steam Floats up from those dim fields about the homes Of happy men that have the power to die, And grassy barrows of the happier dead. Release me, and restore me to the ground;

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Human Drift by Jack London:

deer and in a blind madness of terror rushed aft along the poop, heading for the cabin. Gone was all my arrogance of youth and my intellectual calm. I had seen a ghost. There, in the dim light, where we had flung the dead man overboard, I had seen a faint and wavering form. Six-feet in length it was, slender, and of substance so attenuated that I had distinctly seen through it the tracery of the fore-rigging.

As for me, I was as panic-stricken as a frightened horse. I, as I, had ceased to exist. Through me were vibrating the fibre- instincts of ten thousand generations of superstitious forebears who had been afraid of the dark and the things of the dark. I was

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from La Grande Breteche by Honore de Balzac:

my worthy landlady had communicated the secret of which I was to be the sole possessor, but I listened.

" 'Monsieur,' said she, 'when the Emperor sent the Spaniards here, prisoners of war and others, I was required to lodge at the charge of the Government a young Spaniard sent to Vendome on parole. Notwithstanding his parole, he had to show himself every day to the sub-prefect. He was a Spanish grandee--neither more nor less. He had a name in /os/ and /dia/, something like Bagos de Feredia. I wrote his name down in my books, and you may see it if you like. Ah! he was a handsome young fellow for a Spaniard, who are all ugly they say. He was not more than five feet two or three in height, but so well made;


La Grande Breteche