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Today's Stichomancy for V. I. Lenin

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne:

while, in its swifter and livelier passages there appeared a channel-way of pebbles, and brown, sparkling sand. Letting the eyes follow along the course of the stream, they could catch the reflected light from its water, at some short distance within the forest, but soon lost all traces of it amid the bewilderment of tree-trunks and underbush, and here and there a huge rock covered over with gray lichens. All these giant trees and boulders of granite seemed intent on making a mystery of the course of this small brook; fearing, perhaps, that, with its never-ceasing loquacity, it should whisper tales out of the heart of the old forest whence it flowed, or mirror its revelations on the smooth


The Scarlet Letter
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Exiles by Honore de Balzac:

"If you have not deceived me," she said to Jacqueline, "I promise you a hundred crowns in gold."

"Behold, madame," said the woman, "the poor angel is confiding--here is all his treasure."

As she spoke, Jacqueline opened a drawer in the table and showed some parchments.

"God of mercy!" cried the Countess, snatching up a document that caught her eye, on which she read, /Gothofredus Comes Gantiacus/ (Godefroid, Count of Ghent).

She dropped the parchment, and passed her hand over her brow; then, feeling, no doubt, that she had compromised herself by showing so much

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Captain Stormfield by Mark Twain:

there wasn't ever more than one good lecture audience of white people, all put together, in America - I mean the whole thing, British Possessions and all; in the beginning of our century there were only 6,000,000 or 7,000,000 - say seven; 12,000,000 or 14,000,000 in 1825; say 23,000,000 in 1850; 40,000,000 in 1875. Our death-rate has always been 20 in 1000 per annum. Well, 140,000 died the first year of the century; 280,000 the twenty-fifth year; 500,000 the fiftieth year; about a million the seventy-fifth year. Now I am going to be liberal about this thing, and consider that fifty million whites have died in America from the beginning up to to-day - make it sixty, if you want to; make it a hundred million -